kotlin logging performance

Smart logging in Java 8 and Kotlin

Logging is a not a sexy subject but it’s important nonetheless. In the Java world, logging frameworks range from Log4J to SLF4J via Commons Logging and JDK logging (let’s exclude Log4J 2 for the time being). Though different in architecture and features, all of their API look the same. The logger has a method for each log level e.g.: debug(String message)info(String message)error(String message)etc. Levels are organized into a hierarchy. Once the framework is configured at a certain

logging spring boot

Log management in Spring Boot

Logging is for sure not a glamorous subject, but it’s a critical one - at least for DevOps and Ops teams. While there are plenty of material on the Web describing how to change your ASCII banner, there is not much on how to efficiently manage the log output. By default, Spring Boot will output log on the console and not use any file at all. However, it’s possible to tell Spring Boot to log in an output file. At the simplest level, the path where Spring Boot will put the spring.log

logging slf4j

Configuring Maven to use SLF4J

I mainly write articles for two reasons: to understand something that is new to me or to document something I regularly have to explain to others. This article definitely falls in the second category: in order to celebrate the new 1.0.0 version of Logback, I’ve decided to write down once and for all how to properly use SLF4J with Maven since it seems there’s no shortage of questions about it. Basics The basis of SLF4J is to have two separate components, one API and one implementat