Object-Oriented Programming OOP Spring

Is Object-Oriented Programming compatible with an enteprise context?

This week, during a workshop related to a Java course I give at a higher education school, I noticed the code produced by the students was mostly - ok, entirely, procedural. In fact, though the Java language touts itself as an Object-Oriented language, it's not uncommon to find such code developed by professional developers in enterprises. For example, the JavaBean specification is in direct contradiction of one of OOP's main principle, encapsulation.

Spring configuration Groovy Kotlin XML annotations

Flavors of Spring application context configuration

Every now and then, there’s an angry post or comment bitching about how the Spring framework is full of XML, how terrible and verbose it is, and how the author would never use it because of that. Of course, that is completely crap. First, when Spring was created, XML was pretty hot. J2EE deployment descriptors (yes, that was the name at the time) was XML-based. Anyway, it’s 2017 folks, and there are multiple ways to skin a cat. This article aims at listing the different ways a Sprin

Spring autowiring component scan good practice

A use-case for Spring component scan

Regular readers of this blog know I’m a big proponent of the Spring framework, but I’m quite opinionated in the way it should be used. For example, I favor explicit object instantiation and explicit component wiring over self-annotated classes, component scanning and autowiring. Concepts Though those concepts are used by many Spring developers, my experience has taught me they are not always fully understood. Some explanation is in order. Self-annotated classes Self-annotated c